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Discover Resources by Tags: gentrification

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Number of items: 5.

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Analysing the social externalities of transport projects- The case of the Metro de Lima
Recently the planning field has been questioning about gentrification and displacement processes due to transport investments. Making efforts to measure gentrification and displacement, authors have tried many tools to find correlations between the new transport project and its potential impacts in the urban space. Rather than finding a relationship, this study focuses on identifying the potential externalities of the first Metro line in Lima in three different socioeconomic areas, and its results when transport and development are not well articulated.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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Comparative analysis of the achievements and limitations of projects that support local businesses in a gentrification area: A case study on Brixton
This dissertation conducts a comparative analysis of the achievements and limitations of Pop Brixton and Brixton Pound, projects that support local businesses in a gentrification area, based on Brixton. Through this, this study aims to find the answers to how the projects that support local businesses work in a gentrification area and what are the achievements and limitations of the projects that support local businesses.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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The Hubs of Probabilistic Encounters
An Analytical Exploration of Beirut Digital District

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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The social impacts of urban development in Hong Kong: local residents’ perspectives
The trajectory of urban development in Hong Kong has produced a culture where property development has become a powerful force in society that has shaped its key institutions and built up the ethos of property accumulation as the measure of ultimate success. Driven by three key institutions: the government, property developers, and the MTR, Hong Kong’s urban railway company, urban development has massively transformed the territory’s neighbourhoods and communities. This dissertation contributes to the under-researched juncture between urban transformation and community relations in the context of a development-dominant culture by considering the case study of Sai Ying Pun, a Hong Kong neighbourhood that has undergone such urban change. Through a mixed method approach the perspectives of residents and businesses from two key communities, as well as experts, are studied. The findings reveal that the impacts of urban change are not experienced evenly by each community, and even if displacement does not occur, the benefits do not fall symmetrically. The research also demonstrates the continued faith placed in the power of the institutionalised property development apparatus to enhance the urban landscape and to improve the lives of residents, as well as the enduring belief amongst Hong Kong people of its potential as a vehicle for upwards social mobility.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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Transit-oriented development and housing inequality: Testing the effectiveness of the Balanced Housing policy in Jakarta, Indonesia.
The concept of Transit-oriented Development (TOD) has been widely practised in big cities, including Tokyo, Hong Kong, London, and New York City, to improve urban lives by integrating land use and transportation planning (Atmadja and Bogunovich, 2019; Murray and Weerappulige, 2021), and addressing urban-related issues, comprising poverty, transport emissions, disintegrated urban system, and lack of affordable housing (Boarnet et al., 2017; Derakhti and Baeten, 2020). However, TOD poses potential risks of transit-induced gentrification and housing inequality (Ahlfeldt and Wendland, 2009; Duncan, 2011). Several countries, including Thailand, India, Colombia, the US, and the UK, introduced the inclusionary housing concept to respond to the risks. In Indonesia, the Balanced Housing policy was created to form social harmony in TOD areas (Mungkasa, 2020; Benson, 2010). However, its effectiveness is yet to be studied (Farha, 2017; Maharani, 2015).This study compares inclusionary housing policy in Jakarta and other cities in developing and developed countries to identify the research limitation from the existing literature. This research collects primary and secondary data through grey and academic literature reviews, semistructured interviews, and electronic surveys. The analysis of housing inequality and the Balanced Housing policy's effectiveness is based on house price mappings around the selected TOD areas in Jakarta, the electronic survey's findings from the impacted communities, and the perspectives of the experts, planners, academics, private developers, and nonprofit organisations on the Balanced Housing policy's enforcement in Jakarta.The research finds that despite contributing to the housing production in Jakarta, the Balanced Housing policy is still ineffective in fostering inclusive neighbourhoods and creating affordable housing to address housing inequality in Jakarta TOD areas. The research findings and lessons learned from other countries become the basis to provide some policy suggestions for Indonesia's government to make the current Balanced Housing and conversion fund policy perform better, including the need for creating a more efficient planning process and enforcement. This research also recommends future studies involving academics and experts to provide more dialogues between academia and the practitioners in view of the Balanced Housing policy's effectiveness in Jakarta TOD areas.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

This list was generated on Sun Feb 25 15:11:19 2024 UTC.