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Discover Resources by Tags: urban mobility

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Ride-hailing and Social Exclusion: A study of Low Income Neighbourhoods in Bogotá
Ride-hailing services have grown ingrained in the urban mobility landscapes of cities all over the world. Uber alone has completed over 10 billion rides across 10,000 cities in a decade (Uber, 2018; Uber, 2020). During this time, ride-hailing players have revolutionized the transport sector by disrupting the taxi industry, public transport systems and labour protection laws. Despite its growing popularity in cities, many unknowns about ride-hailing’s impact make it difficult to regulate. The case of Uber, which faced regulatory hurdles and briefly ceased operations in Colombia in January 2020 (Feiner, 2020), a first for any LAC nation, exemplifies this. In the context of concerns about urban sustainability and social equity, Oviedo et al (2020) emphasize that as this new mode becomes more popular in LAC, assessing its impact becomes all the more crucial for local authorities and transport planning organizations. Scholars argue that research on this topic has been limited due to under-conceptualisation (Gomez‐Morantes et al, 2021), knowledge gaps regarding emerging markets (Granada et al, 2018) and a lack of focus on distributional perspectives and social disparities (Oviedo et al, 2021). Moreover, disagreements about the effects of ride-hailing and the resulting regulatory inconsistencies stem mainly from a lack of adequate data. Due to the novelty of the service and the unwillingness of its companies to disclose information due to privacy concerns, it has been difficult to measure the impact of ride-hailing. As a result, most of what is known comes from small survey samples, such as Henao's (2018). To overcome these limitations, this dissertation leverages one of the largest ride-hailing focused datasets made available by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) which captures responses from over 4000 LAC respondents. By placing ride-hailing within the well-established transport related social exclusion literature, this timely research adds much-needed information to the field of transport, specifically to the sub-discipline of shared mobility. The dissertation recognizes the complexity of framing the various dimensions of Transport Related Social Exclusion and analyzing all these effects in one study. However, at the core, under this theoretical framework, the research objective is to examine the potentially restrictive nature of ride-hailing for residents in LI neighbourhoods in Bogotá, Colombia. Ride-Hailing, Transport Equity, Transport Related Social Exclusion, Urban Mobility, Latin America

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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Spatial politics of mobility transitions: Bicycle urbanism & Spatial Justice
This dissertation investigates social implications of built environment interventions (BEI) related to bicycle urbanism from a Spatial Justice (Soja, 2010) perspective. By combining urban spatial theory and mobilities research, the novel theoretical framework Mobility Space helps to analyse spatial, experiential and discursive aspects of urban mobility priorities concomitantly and is thus an adequate analytical tool to uncover how recently proliferating cycling strategies impact society through an alteration of urban space. A qualitative and multi-method research design combines descriptive mapping, virtual site observation and semi-structured interviews to apply Mobility Space to the controversial Mini-Holland programme in Waltham Forest, London. Examining in detail the Walthamstow Village scheme, the research finds three patterns by which BEI related to bicycle urbanism re-organize movement, re-allocate space and re-design public realm to prioritize active travel and dwelling while discouraging car use. Those spatial alterations shift the political organization of space which in turn affects the Right to the City (Lefebvre et al., 1996) – an expression of Spatial Justice – as it enables a greater diversity of people to use urban space (right to appropriation) and makes them conscious how the space they inhabit is discursively produced and the outcome of contentious decision-making processes (right to participation). This research is relevant for urban professionals as environmental as well as pandemic-related urban mobility challenges necessitate a transformation of urban space to accommodate cycling, but negative outcomes for social equity, as resulting from car-urbanism, need to be avoided.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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