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Discover Resources by Tags: regeneration

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Number of items: 5.

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Building Instability": the impacts of regeneration activity on local residents: the case of Southall, London
qualitative study of local residents of a regeneration area in London, seeking to understand the impacts which policy-led heightened development activity and the commodification of land is having on their lived experience.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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Decanting on Estate Regeneration Schemes in London: Professional perspectives on responsibility and objectives
v‘Decanting’ refers to the process of moving people out of estates which are slated for demolition or redevelopment by local councils as part of a regeneration scheme. As an aspect of regeneration, it has thus been identified by some academics as a mechanism which enables gentrification and facilitates displacement of low-income residents. This dissertation seeks to enhance our understanding of how decanting functions in practice by sharing the testimony of council employees who have overseen decants on certain regeneration schemes. The research for this paper involved conducting interviews with employees of councils, developers and housing associations, particularly those in areas not commonly analysed in existing academic literature. Its purpose was not to challenge the perspectives and experiences shared by these interviewees, but merely to present their views and observe differences with prevailing narratives in current academic discourse on regeneration and decanting. The findings from this research suggest that previous academic accounts of decanting may overvalue the negative experiences of a minority of dissatisfied residents on certain estates when determining how decanting generally affects displaced individuals. Moreover, they neglect to adequately consider how council employees who oversee decanting approach their work, largely ignoring the principles by which they operate, underestimating the limitations and obstacles they encounter, and understating the extent to which the maintenance of harmonious relationships with decanted residents is conducive to frictionless development.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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Establishing a tool-kit for infill development on post-war Mid to High rise estates to improve open space and the relationship with the wider street
After decades of cessation in council house building and depleting stock numbers, local authorities have recently been given the means to start building again to meet the UK housing shortage. Low density council owned estates, in particular post-war mid to high rise estates, present an obvious opportunity to deliver intensification through infill development. Infill development, however, should benefit existing residents by addressing major problems, such as poor-quality open spaces and the tenuous relationship with the street. This study proposes a tool-kit to guide infill development on post-war, mid to high-rise estates in an attempt to find out how infill development can improve open spaces and the relationship that estates have with the streets. The tool-kit incorporates principles brought to light in a literature review of council estate regeneration theories and infill development case studies on post-war, mid to high rise estates. A design response on the Home Park Estate utilising the tool-kit is used to evaluate the tool-kit, leading to a conclusion that infill development implemented in accordance with the tool-kit would produce higher quality, more useful open spaces and strengthen the relationships that estates have with the wider street to produce safer and more cohesive streets. Further research is needed to determine resident’s aspirations for infill development and to determine the financial viability of infill.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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Exploiting the above and below ground legacy of mining to give former mine locations a reviewed role at the heart of former mining communities.
This work aims to explore opportunities to regenerate the mining site and make it central to community life.Paper in-depth analyses issues and existing regeneration strategies of mining towns, that can be translated into a new design concept for Stainforth.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

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Relocating Communities: From The Boleyn Ground to The London Stadium
The investigation looks at the topics of; stadia redevelopment; contractual landscapes in regeneration; concepts on being at home; the commercialisation of football and community displacement In doing so, this paper begins to elucidate the perspectives of a community who's experience reveals a clash between the values of commerce, communities, legacy and dividend. The 2012 Olympic legacy promises emphasised the long term use of infrastructure and in March 2013, 'E20 Stadium LLP' confirmed that West Ham United Football Club would be the London Stadium's long-term concessionaire. The relocation to the London Stadium was the catalyst for supporter resentment. many opposed the move on the grounds that the decision to move co-opted the identity of the club for commercial gain. There was scant democratic consultation and supporters failed to see tangible benefits materialise at the London Stadium. Negative sentiment peaked on 10 March 2018, with a riot erupting at the London Stadium which was targeted at the clubs owners. This research begins to elucidate the perspectives of those who experience the post-Olympic environment, by posing the question: Why was there a backlash to the move to the London Stadium from the supporters of West Ham United Football Club?

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

This list was generated on Wed Feb 21 13:06:35 2024 UTC.