OpenEd@UCL

Discover Resources by Tags: community

Up a level
Export as [feed] Atom [feed] RSS 1.0 [feed] RSS 2.0
[tool] Batch List
Number of items: 8.

[img]
Preview
Communities in the information society, real or virtual?
This presentation is taken from a Master's level module, 'Legal and social aspects of electronic publishing', taught at the Department of Information Studies, University College London. The header page for this collection of resources is at: http://ucloer.eprints-hosting.org/id/eprint/23.

Shared with the World by Simon Mahony

[img]
Preview
Increasing Flood Resilience: Low-Income Urban Neighbourhoods in the Global South
This major research project explores the paradigm shift in the flood management discourse from flood mitigation to flood resilience through design. It explores how urban design could be used as a tool to increase flood resilience of low-income urban neighbourhoods in the Global South nations. The project shows that urban design is a bedrock for holistic flood management that could simultaneously help low-income communities achieve a more sustainable livelihood.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

collection
Legal and social aspects of electronic publishing
A collection of teaching materials taken from a Masters level module at University College London with a focus on the digital humanities and the legal and social aspects of electronic publishing. The header page with list of contents and links is at: http://ucloer.eprints-hosting.org/id/eprint/24. The materials here were originally constructed as part of a project titled 'OER Digital Humanities (DHOER)' at University College London, funded under the UK Open Educational Resources, phase II, Ai: release strand (06/10) in 2011 by the Higher Education Academy (HEA) and Jisc. The 'Legal and social aspects of electronic publishing - full.7z' zipped folder contains all of the collection items in open document formats.

Shared with the World by Simon Mahony

[img]
Legal and social aspects of electronic publishing - full
This zipped folder contains all of the 'Legal and social aspects of electronic publishing' collection items. This is a collection of teaching materials taken from a Master's level module at University College London with a focus on the digital humanities and the legal and social aspects of electronic publishing. The header page with list of contents and links is at: http://ucloer.eprints-hosting.org/id/eprint/24 and the full collection can be viewed at http://ucloer.eprints-hosting.org/23/. The materials here were originally constructed as part of a project titled 'OER Digital Humanities (DHOER)' at University College London, funded under the UK Open Educational Resources, phase II, Ai: release strand (06/10) in 2011 by the Higher Education Academy (HEA) and Jisc.

Shared with the World by Simon Mahony

[img]
Mapping for Change: UCL Social Enterprise Project of the Year Award 2013 [URL hyperlink to video file]
UCL Social Enterprise Project of the Year Award 2013 awarded to Mapping for Change at the 2013 UCL Awards for Enterprise.

Shared with the World by Melissa Lamptey

[img]
Preview
Mind, Body and Soul: An investigation into the architectural and ideological functions of the Great Western Railway’s Swindon Railway Village
Located at the centre of Swindon, the Swindon Railway Village (SRV) was a residential and social hub for Swindon and its Great Western Railway (GWR) locomotive and carriage works. The SRV was established in 1841 to the designs of the famous engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel and expanded throughout the latter half of the nineteenth century to serve the GWR’s needs. By 1891, it comprised of around 287 cottages, a large mechanics’ institute, a market, a cottage hospital, an expansive company park, an Anglican church, a Methodist chapel, swimming baths and a medical dispensary. The SRV was a complex multi-functional space that could support a railway worker from cradle to grave. This report aims to reinvigorate an understudied area and to answer the central research question— what were the architectural and ideological functions of the SRV?

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

[img]
Preview
Relocating Communities: From The Boleyn Ground to The London Stadium
The investigation looks at the topics of; stadia redevelopment; contractual landscapes in regeneration; concepts on being at home; the commercialisation of football and community displacement In doing so, this paper begins to elucidate the perspectives of a community who's experience reveals a clash between the values of commerce, communities, legacy and dividend. The 2012 Olympic legacy promises emphasised the long term use of infrastructure and in March 2013, 'E20 Stadium LLP' confirmed that West Ham United Football Club would be the London Stadium's long-term concessionaire. The relocation to the London Stadium was the catalyst for supporter resentment. many opposed the move on the grounds that the decision to move co-opted the identity of the club for commercial gain. There was scant democratic consultation and supporters failed to see tangible benefits materialise at the London Stadium. Negative sentiment peaked on 10 March 2018, with a riot erupting at the London Stadium which was targeted at the clubs owners. This research begins to elucidate the perspectives of those who experience the post-Olympic environment, by posing the question: Why was there a backlash to the move to the London Stadium from the supporters of West Ham United Football Club?

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

[img]
Preview
Social Infrastructure for the 21st Century: The Cases of Every One Every Day and the Idea Stores
Over the course of the last 30 years, changes in governance trends have led to a growing opportunity for citizen participation in decision-making at the level of local government. The 2011 Localism Act enshrined this in planning policy. However, the voluntary uptake of participatory planning mechanisms has been mixed at best. Areas with wealthier communities with more resources have been more likely to see these opportunities realised in a way they are not in areas with less affluent communities. UK planning policy does not specify the means by which local authorities should engage their communities but social infrastructure is implicated as a possible way to do this. This dissertation will therefore explore the potential contribution social infrastructure could make to empowering communities to play a more active role in the planning system. Community empowerment will be defined by using the concept of social capital and Sen’s capabilities approach. There has been considerable interest in libraries and participatory culture spaces since the start of the 21st century for their ability to generate social capital and broaden communities’ capabilities. This dissertation will look at two examples from East London. The first being Every One Every Day, the UK’s biggest participation scheme, in Barking & Dagenham and the second being the Idea Stores, a chain of modernised libraries, in Tower Hamlets. These examples will be used to make the case for a new type of social infrastructure that can empower communities and contribute to achieving participatory planning in line with the evolution of governance and recommendations in current planning policy. The findings from this study suggest that participatory culture spaces and libraries sit among wider networks of social infrastructure that, when combined, facilitate the social life and political power of communities across the UK to a greater or lesser degree.

Shared with the World by Elangkathir Duhindan

This list was generated on Thu Feb 9 06:25:45 2023 UTC.